Geut, Raising The Fallen

כמה דאתחיל ברכה
Sefer HaBahir, verse 3 excerpt

Traditional interpretation: “… in order that it begin with a blessing.”

Liorah’s interpretation: “… (to discern) how many thirst to know enabled power to develop proper abilities.”

The word דאתחיל through the gematria of 453 is first associated with the sefirah Yesod, as explained in earlier entries, The Blessing Of Kosher Development and Choshen Mishpat. In the former entry I posited the idea that raising Yesod also uplifts Malchut and linked the action to the concept of geut. Further analysis of the word דאתחיל helps us to understand why this is the case.

דאתחיל “begins” (as the word is traditionally translated) with the letter dalet ד. Dalet is associated with the sefirah Malchut and the consciousness of shiflut. R’ Yitzchak Ginsburgh writes regarding dalet as it pertains to Malchut, shiflut and geut:

In the Zohar, dalet is read as “that has nothing [d’leit] of her own.” This expresses the property of the lowest of the Divine Emanations, the sefirah of malchut, “kingdom,” which has no light other than that which it receives from the higher sefirot. In man’s service of God, the dalet characterizes “shiflut,” “lowliness,” the consciousness of possessing nothing of one’s own …

Shiflut is the spiritual state associated with the sefirah of Malchut … In direct proportion to his existential state of shiflut (whose root shefel means “low tide”), is the true king able to manifest that state of “upliftedness” (geut, the “high tide”) necessary to constructively rule over his people (the two terms, shefel and geut, exactly equaling one another in gematria).

From this we can see that the word דאתחיל (in this excerpt from verse 3), generally associated with the sefirah Yesod, is specifically associated with ateret hayesod, the origin of Malchut.

Thus, by raising Yesod, through Malchut’s origin in ateret hayesod, Malchut is likewise raised. Moreover, as before the primordial sin, the ayin of skin is raised to the aleph of light, also as previously elucidated in The Blessing Of Kosher Development.

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