Running On Regalim

I dreamt.

The oppressive rulers were gathering up people on a small ridge [1, רכס] and throwing them into a large river [2,7] to kill them. I was brought there too. A man was with me and we escaped from the gathered crowd of people. Our escape was noticed.

We had a head start, running (see ratzo vashov) from our pursuers רודפים, but the man I was with knew those pursuing us would soon catch up. We were running on foot [3, רגלים see shalosh regalim and exile].

We had no weapons with which to kill them, so the man decided to lock us up so that we couldn’t be taken back to the river or be killed bodily by spear. There were two lockers nearby. So, first he locked me up in what looked like a long body-length (see guf kadosh) school or gym locker [4,7 ארונית]. Then he locked himself up in the one next to it. Our locked lockers stood (amidah), and then lay resting side by side (see world-to-come and totafot).

The pursuers caught up with us. They knew we were hiding in the locked lockers (see 7 double letters, sefer yetzirah) but they couldn’t unlock the lockers to pull out and recapture us. They tried very hard to unlock our hiding places (setarim סתרים), but were unsuccessful.

In frustration, they tried to “poke through” the locked door of my locker (see alef) with their fingers to spear me. I saw the temporary “indentation” where they tried to poke their way into my chamber. The mystery metal somehow allowed the form to show the attempt, like a malleable membrane might conform to the form of that trying but unable to break through.

When they realized that they wouldn’t be able to break in to draw me out they decided to throw [5] our lockers out into deep dark space. And they did.

Yet, when they had gone, our lockers landed back down on earth (see ratzo vashov). We emerged [6].

Footnotes:

[1] from the shoresh רכס meaning to connect or bind artificially

[2] “The Ari spent much of his time secluded in a small house along the Nile river where he studied uninterruptedly. Here Eliyahu Ha’navi would appear to him and teach him the secrets of the Torah known as Sod or Kabbalah. He once told his students that it would take him eighty years to teach them what he was able to learn in just one night.” Israel iguide

[3] “There are two kinds of middos, those with which one is born and those to which one must acclimate oneself. Those with which one is born are called “derachav” (his path), for they are one’s derech from the beginning of one’s creation. Those to which one becomes acclimated are called regel (habit or foot), because one becomes acclimated (hirgil) to them. Those [middos] to which one becomes acclimated, one must guard and straighten them a lot. When one guards them, then those that were in one’s nature will certainly be guarded.” R’ Dov Kramer, Aish Das

[4] lockers, from the shoresh ארה meaning to contain and leader, as opposed to the shoresh נעל meaning foot (see Barefoot Path of the Neviah).

[5] “There is also a verb derived from yad – ידה – meaning ‘to throw, hurl, cast’. ” Dave at Balashon on the letter yod

[6] “To survive and emerge physically unaffected exemplifies the existential power of spontaneous rebirth-the Divine “Holy of Holies” imbuing the soul of the would-be martyr with the power to metamorphose his body. This level corresponds to the actual “spark of God” within the yehida of the Jewish soul. This spark derives from the essence of the Infinite Light above (“preceding”) the primordial contraction”-tzimtzum. The secret of tzimtzum excludes, from the perspective of creation, the possibility of an absolute miracle as described above. The “spark of God” enclothed within each Jewish soul allows for the manifestation of such a miracle. This is ultimately the secret and purpose of the presence of the Jewish soul in creation.” R’ Yitzach Ginsburgh, Gal Einai Institute

[7] Note the shoresh (ארה) of the word I chose to denote locker (ארונית) is from the same root as Ari (lion, aryeh אריה) who spent time by the side of the Nile.

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One Response to “Running On Regalim”

  1. bob Says:

    good post – filled my coffee break

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